History/Heritage

History/Heritage / by editor

Toys of the Myanmar children originated from the countryside where a grandfather might have whittled a cow or elephant, form a bird whistle out of clay or soak some old newspapers in glue, dry into required shapes and finally paint them to create colourful tigers or horses.

History/Heritage

History/Heritage / by editor

Scholars believe that the Myanmar people are descendents of Tibeto-Burman migrants who entered the land that was to become Myanmar  from the northwest; as well as Mon-Khmer people who entered from the southeast.  However, the discovery in central Myanmar of the fossilized jawbones of  Amphipithecus bahinensis suggests the inhabitants may have evolved from  primate ancestors who were already in

History/Heritage

History/Heritage / by editor

The first Myanmar Empire of the 11th Century based in Bagan left remnants of its glory not in forts or palaces but in the thousands of pagodas, stupas (Zedi) and temples. (Pagodas are any place of worship regardless of shape, size or design. Stupas or Zedi are pointed spires in all sizes with a gem-crusted ornate crown called umbrella at the tip.

History/Heritage

History/Heritage / by editor

To the unaccustomed ear, Burmese music at first sounds like crashing thunder. When the ear finally adjusts to the loudness, it will begin to notice the rhythm of the gongs, the delicate weaving in and out of the wailing oboe and the sharp sweet notes from the drum circle, wherein sits the maestro of the orchestra.

History/Heritage

History/Heritage / by editor

Photo from the book Burma Typical Photographs

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